SULLIVAN COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY

HISTORY MAKER AND HISTORY PRESERVER AWARDS

The individual biographies are original script from the Award Ceremony Programs, which were distributed at the time the awards were made.

To preserve the integrity and meaningfulness of the award, no editing has been made to the original script.

History Maker History Preserver

SULLIVAN COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY HISTORY PRESERVER AWARD 2015

 

winterberger bioElsie Winterberger (1910 - )

For Elsie Winterberger, the preservation of the history for her beloved town of Forestburgh was a labor of love. Her reverence for the past originated early in her life, heavily influenced by the era of rural schools and steam locomotives. Her memory and superb recollection of these earlier times were the conduit that bridged the experiences from her youth to the historical crusades that made up her later years. “I grew up in an era that is now nearing its end, and my job as historian gives me all the excuse I need to record those years in photos and words for the town,” Elsie once exclaimed. “I always say what’s on my mind and I don’t mince words. I’ve lived here all my life, I know the history of this town inside out. I even know town history they hoped I didn’t know.” Known for being persistence and with unrelenting energy, Elsie’s spirited advocacy of history helped raise greater awareness for historic preservation throughout the town and county.

Read more: Elsie Winterberger

SULLIVAN COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY HISTORY MAKER AWARD 2015

 

History Maker david goldHarold Gold (09/20/1923 - )

 

There are many ways to make history. A person can hold political office and decide vital matters of war and peace, invent machines that reshape the economy, or solve mysteries of the galaxies. Or a person can do ordinary things to an extraordinary degree and through dedication make the community a better place. My father, Harold Gold, has never held political office, invented transformative devices, or revolutionized science, but he has made local history through his business and community service in Sullivan County.

 

Read more: Harold Gold

SULLIVAN COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY HISTORY MAKER AWARD 2014

 

logolongbeards2Sullivan County Long Beards

Since the very earliest days of Sullivan County history, the county’s forests and streams have provided both sport and subsistence to outdoor enthusiasts. Over the years, the exploits of these sportsmen have been well chronicled, from the early writings of James Quinlan to the current essays of Sullivan County Historian, John Conway. Among the numerous sportsmen’s clubs throughout the county that share in this heritage, the Sullivan County Long Beards are true representatives. Chartered with the National Wild Turkey Federation, the local chapter has promoted, over the years, the involvement of outdoor activity through education and conservation. The sponsors of numerous programs, the

Sullivan County Long Beards are committed to passing on this heritage, as well as the preservation and improvement of habitat, for future generations.

Read more: Sullivan County Long Beards

SULLIVAN COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY HISTORY PRESERVER AWARD 2014

 

PBBurns-WebPatricia and William Burns

 

The stated mission of the Sullivan County Historical Society has been no better exemplified than through the endeavors of “Pat” and “Bill” Burns. Through their historical knowledge and organizational skills, the Society has developed an excellence in the preservation of Sullivan County history, from the management of archival material to the day-to-day tasks of operating the County Museum. Because of their stewardship, the Society continues to remain viable, even in these days of economical and technological challenges.

Read more: Patricia and William Burns

SULLIVAN COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY HISTORY MAKER AWARD 2013

 

GOlmstead.jpgGladys Olmsted, RN (10/19/1924 - 8/10/1997)

a pioneer in public health nursing in Sullivan County began her career as the county’s first Public Health Nurse in 1951, in an “office” with a dirt floor in the basement of the courthouse and retired 34 years later as the Director of the Sullivan County Public Health Nursing Service. She saw great drama in public health nursing, “cutting down the rate of premature infant births, helping someone with polio move a muscle.” “How could you not be excited?” 

Read more: Gladys Olmsted

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